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  1. Data resource: Borders Backyard Biodiversity

    The dataset comprises faunal records from a a^??local patcha^?? survey run by the Scottish Borders Biological Records Centre titled Borders Backyard Biodiversity. A list of 61 species of birds, mammals, amphibians and butterflies likely to be seen in the surveyora^??s garden or local patch was provided, with the option of recording additional species.

  2. Data resource: Brachycera (Diptera) records from Britain and Ireland to 1990

    This dataset is held at the BRC and was used for the 1991 publication: 'Provisional Atlas of the Larger Brachycera (Diptera) of Britain and Ireland'. The dataset covers robberflies, bee flies, soldierflies, horseflies and their allies. Data were collected by volunteer recorders and compiled by the Larger Brachycera Recording Scheme, which began in 1976.

  3. Data resource: Brecknock county birds records

    Bird records collated by Brecknock County Bird recorder including recorders digitised from species cards under contract supervised by BIS and funded by Welsh Biodiversity Partnership. Sensitive records have been removed. Other bird records may be included in other datasets managed by BIS.

  4. Data resource: Breeding Waders of Wet Meadows surveys in England and Wales, 1982 and 2002

    Wet lowland grassland as a habitat has been disappearing quite fast over the last few decades as more and more has been drained or rendered less suitable for breeding birds. In the 1970s, an estimated 8000ha of the habitat was drained each year. The loss of wet lowland grassland and reduction in quality has particularly affected some wader species, which in the past have been more or less dependent on it. The BTO and RSPB have run two main surveys (1982 and 2002) to identify all areas of damp lowland grassland in England and Wales and to count the numbers of breeding waders using them. Five main species were counted: Lapwing <i>Vanellus vanellus</i>, Snipe <i>Gallinago gallinago</i>, Curlew <i>Numenius arquata</i>, Redshank <i>Tringa totanus</i> and Oystercatcher <i>Haematopus ostralegus</i>. Other rare breeding waders, which they came across were recorded, including Avocet <i>Recurvirostra avosetta</i>, Little Ringed Plover <i>Charadrius dubius</i> Ringed Plover <i>C. hiaticula</i>, Black-tailed Godwit <i>Limosa limosa</i>, Ruff <i>Philomachus pugnax</i> and Common Sandpiper <i>Actitis hypoleucos</i> as well as any Yellow Wagtails <i>Motacilla flava</i> However, this dataset only includes records of the five main species. The surveys were intended to give an assessment of the remaining grasslands and their bird populations, and provide an inventory of the most important sites to aid the conservation of the species. The data included in this dataset are a summary of the number of birds in a site, which is represented as the central 1km grid square. The problems of agricultural improvement are no less acute in Scotland, where the breeding wader populations of the straths and glens are under severe pressure. In 1982, a parallel survey of Breeding Waders of Scottish Agricultural Land was launched by Hector Galbraith and continued in 1983, looking at the same five wader species on all agricultural land (see Galbraith & Furness 1983 <i>Scottish Birds</i> 12: 148-153). In both surveys, many of the birds found were on nature reserves, or other sites which had some form of protection from detrimental agricultural practices. Despite the protected nature of these sites, it is thought that the declines have continued and so careful management of all sites is essential to try to halt the declines. On a wider-scale and in the longer term, more carefully targeted agri-environment schemes may hold the key to reversing declines. 1982 survey: 1178 grassland sites in England and Wales were surveyed in 1982. In addition, a pilot survey in 1980 and 1981 covered 104 sites, which were not repeated during the main survey of 1982. Although the pilot survey data are not included in this dataset, a total of 1282 sites were surveyed covering approximately 240000ha. The area could be measured for 944 sites, and ranged from 2 ha to 1097ha with a median of 71ha (upper and lower quartiles 146ha and 30ha). Of the five key wader species, 11995 pairs were reported (6721 Lapwing, 1979 drumming Snipe, 540 Curlew, 2218 Redshank and 537 Oystercatcher). The total number of pairs exceeded 1000 in three counties: Norfolk (1983 pairs on 149 sites), Cambridgeshire (1422 pairs on 60 sites) and Kent (1262 pairs on 50 sites). It was particularly noted that 48% of the Snipe and 36% of the Redshank were found on just five sites - the Ouse Washes, Nene Washes, North Kent marshes, Derwent Ings and Somerset Levels. Even in 1982, both species were unusual breeding birds over most of the lowlands. There was more than 30% artificial habitat on 97 sites (7.6% of the grassland sites surveyed). Artificial sites included 53 gravel pits, six sewage works, eight reservoirs and 30 other unclassified industrial sites. In total, these sites held 840 pairs of waders, and although a small fraction of the overall total (7.0%) the sites were very important in some counties, especially some inland ones.

  5. Data resource: BRERC species records recorded over 15 years ago

    BRERC species records recorded over 15 years ago within the unitary authority areas of North Somerset, South Gloucestershire, Bristol and Bath & North East Somerset.

  6. Data resource: BRERC species records within last 15 years

    BRERC species records recorded within last 15 years within the unitary authority areas of North Somerset, South Gloucestershire, Bristol and Bath & North East Somerset

  7. Data resource: Bringing Reedbeds to Life Amphibian Survey of two key reedbed sites in England in 2010

    Bringing Reedbeds to Life is an innovative programme of scientific research and habitat monitoring, coupled with practical habitat management advice and training. It represents one of the largest co-ordinated programmes of such work on reedbed wetlands for over a decade. The project aims to generate a better understanding of the requirements of a wider range of reedbed wildlife. This enhanced understanding will be used to inform advice, training, management and future conservation strategies across England's reedbeds. <br /><br /> Spawn searches for common frogs, bottle trapping for newts and auditory and visual searches for marsh frogs were carried out between February and May 2010. Surveys were conducted at RSPB Ham Wall NNR (Somerset) and NE Stodmarsh NNR (Kent). The species encountered in systematic surveys were common frogs (<i>Rana temporaria</i>); marsh frogs (<i>Pelophylax ridibundus</i>) and smooth newts (<i>Lissotriton vulgaris</i>). Adult common toads (<i>Bufo bufo</i>) were observed in reedbed habitat at Ham Wall but were not encountered on systematic surveys. <br /><br /> The project was led by RSPB with 50% funding from Natural England via the Countdown 2010 Biodiversity Action Fund and working in partnership with other partners such as Wildlife Trusts, The National Trust and independent ecological contractors.

  8. Data resource: Bringing Reedbeds to Life Invertebrate Survey of three key reedbed sites in England in 2009, 2010

    Bringing Reedbeds to Life is an innovative programme of scientific research and habitat monitoring, coupled with practical habitat management advice and training. It represents one of the largest co-ordinated programmes of such work on reedbed wetlands for over a decade. The project aims to generate a better understanding of the requirements of a wider range of reedbed wildlife. This enhanced understanding will be used to inform advice, training, management and future conservation strategies across England's reedbeds. <br /><br /> Water traps for aerial invertebrates, pitfall traps for ground-dwelling invertebrates, light traps for Lepidoptera and aquatic netting for aquatic invertebrates were carried out at 3 reedbed sites: Norfolk Wildlife Trust NNR Hickling Broad (Norfolk), Natural England NNR Stodmarsh (Kent), and RSPB NNR Ham Wall (Somerset). Water trap, pitfall trap and aquatic netting surveys were undertaken between June and August 2009. Light trapping for moths was done between June and August 2010. <br /><br /> The project was led by RSPB with 50% funding from Natural England via the Countdown 2010 Biodiversity Action Fund and working in partnership with other partners such as Wildlife Trusts, The National Trust, Buglife, independent ecological contractors, Butterfly Conservation.

  9. Data resource: Bringing Reedbeds to Life Water Vole and Mink Survey of five key reedbed sites in England in 2009, 2010

    Bringing Reedbeds to Life is an innovative programme of scientific research and habitat monitoring, coupled with practical habitat management advice and training. It represents one of the largest co-ordinated programmes of such work on reedbed wetlands for over a decade. The project aims to generate a better understanding of the requirements of a wider range of reedbed wildlife. This enhanced understanding will be used to inform advice, training, management and future conservation strategies across England's reedbeds. <br /><br /> Water voles were surveyed using two methods: water vole rafts within reedbeds and mink rafts in ditches. This is the first such systematic survey of water vole use of the internal parts of reedbeds as far as we are aware. In addition, mink records from mink rafts in ditches were analysed. Water vole raft surveys were carried out at 3 key reedbed sites: RSPB Ham Wall NNR (Somerset), NE Stodmarsh NNR (Kent) and NWT Hickling Broad NNR (Norfolk). Mink raft surveys were carried out at five sites, the additional two being Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust Far Ings NNR and National Trust Wicken Fen (Cambridgeshire). <br /><br /> The main finding of the surveys was that water vole was present at the five reedbed sites despite the presence of mink also. Therefore reedbeds provide a habitat where the two species can coexist.

  10. Data resource: Bruchidae and Chrysomelidae beetle data from iRecord

    Species records for beetles in families Bruchidae (seed beetles) and Chrysomelidae (leaf beetles), from datasets made available via iRecord and verified by the Bruchidae and Chrysomelidae Recording Scheme (scheme organiser Dave Hubble). Records are from datasets stored within the Indicia data warehouse hosted by the Biological Records Centre - these records may originate from direct addition of records to iRecord, or via other datasets that have been added to other Indicia-hosted surveys.